Fishing Reports - Bugatti Reef Feb 2013

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Reef/s:

Months:

Bugatti Reef

Feb 2013

Duration:

Trips:

2 weeks

Nomad Drive Out Mothership

Starting off the year with a two day charter and an unbelievable weather report it was time to get to it with all the boats ready to roll and a boat full of anglers chomping at the bit to get their rods bent we set out. We only had two days as it was a quick promotional trip for the Navico group so we had no time at all to waste. After unloading the boats and getting some anglers in we set off on a glass ocean only to stumble upon shoals of longtail tuna and Mac tuna frothing up the surface, all the guides seemed to have the same idea and a couple quick tuna later we set off to make use of the day.

We had a couple boats on the flats and the others fishing the deeper edges with no shortage of fish, the tides at half neaps there were plenty of Gts up on the flats patrolling for a feed and the guys were getting stuck into them. Alex had an epic session on the flats, sight casting toward GTs and even managed to put a fish of 35kg on 40lb with a Sebile stick shad 114sk in the boat. Quality fish on such light gear catching it in just 1m of water was an achievement, a fish of a lifetime for sure.

On the exact same reef out on the edges we were getting stuck into it, shoals of fusies were balled up on the edge and I didn’t know where to go as they were busting up everywhere. On the run out tide all species seemed to be the go. With this in mind we knew that the early morning session would be the go and it started off with a bang straight up and slowed as the day went on, all in all there was much talk of broken bodies and hurting arms and not from casting all day but from fish. There was also some noticeably big fish around which is always a comforting sight and numerous GTs, some caught were over the 30kg mark.

After being in port for a few days the weather had turned to fresh and frightening but we put our heads down and charged out to the reef. The fishing was a little tough on the first day but that being said we still caught some great fish and managed to get the lighter gear in the mix to tame a few different species. The beauty fishing the reef is that it’s still possible in breezy conditions requiring just a little more planning in your day, fishing the sheltered edges of the reef pays off for GT and also the light gear. One thing I have noticed is that in rough weather conditions the mackerel usually play the game very well so trolling lures along current edges of the reef pays off bigtime and the guys have a ball catching Spaniards up to 30kg on light spin gear.

Continuing with rough weather I set off to an area which I know produces well and is easily fished in a SE, we had a tough time finding fish in the morning and with the rain bucketing down the guys were losing enthusiasm. But a short lunch break anchored up in a lagoon with a little snorkelling fixed this problem quick smart and the guys were straight back into it. After lunch I moved around to the other edge of the reef to meet the run out tide and the game was one, we quickly made up for lost time, double hook up with fish over 25kg to start the session. After that it was practically a fish per cast and a solid specimen of 32kg straight up after a double… not bad going boys. The fishing just seemed to get better and better and every bommie in the bay had fish chomping at the bit to kill things. Our poppers seemed like fairly good targets as we managed to sift through the carnage and put an acceptable tally of fish on the board. We called it a day at around 4:30pm where the guys literally refused to cast, the total ended up very impressive with 2 fish of around 28kg, a fish of 32kg another of 34kg and another which was the last fish of the day ending on a high note of around 55kg. After getting back to the mother ship the measurements calculated the fish to 52.8kg a very fat and healthy specimen, during the afternoon of carnage we were also busted off by two solid fish that ate the lures right near the boat and tore away to bust us off in the reef, I called both over 45kg!!! All the while we were getting torrentially flooded down on, as you can see by some of the pictures, if you had of listened to the excitement and screaming going on that afternoon you would have sworn we were fishing in a glass calm ocean with fish going crazy….epic day one to remember for sure!!!!

The previous day seemed to lift the guys spirits and the next day I had a new bunch of anglers who were ready for the onslaught, once again we left the boat in the morning and dodged our way through some serious rain squalls and with the memory of yesterdays fishing still fresh in mind. The guys weren’t even worried about the moisture falling from the sky, I pulled up to the first point which looked extremely promising, hurried the guys into casting position and sent the lures into the danger zone.

The first cast for the morning got the guys screaming, a sky rocketing mackerel launched on the lure and screamed off with line before we subdued him for a picture and set him free. Not a bad start and with excitement still high we set ourselves for another drift, second cast saw an awesome fish from the bommie edge and absolutely destroyed the lure and 32kg later a solid GTs was held up for pictures.

We only had about a half an hour of tide left in this spot and managed to put another three solid GTs in the boat all over 20kg, the fishing slowed on the change of the tide and we relocated to an area which was copping all the current and the fishing continued. We also noticed that there were heaps of sharks coming and smashing poppers which is always a great sign there’s been consistent action with plenty of fish in the area. One of the guys was a little broken from the last few days so we had him up the front throwing the small stick shads in the reef and just about every cast he had something looking at the lures, shark mackerel, rainbow runners, small GTs, tuna, bludgers gold spots and even a trout was caught along this edge in between the other guys getting some nice GTs.

We decided a lunch session was in order and we headed back to the boat, after which I hurried the guys back into action to catch the last of the tide on a particular spot that I was frothing to fish… we snuck a nice fish through the door straight away but had actually arrived there a little early, so we continued to fish the eddies seeing the odd fish here and there before the tide was right. This is a long ledge where on the last of the run out tide the water washes off the shallows and into theses little gutters where the GTs wait to ambush the smaller fish washing off the shallows. There would have been alot of GTs on the flats previously as the amount of fish that were sitting in those cut outs was ridiculous, we had fish coming up on every cast and I think its safe to say that the guys were literally broken by the time we called it a day. Another end to an insane day’s fishing with over 20 GTs, that’s an awesome tally for any weather condition!

It’s worth a mention that the fishing over those three days was carried out in some horrible, let’s say less than ideal conditions and as luck would have it the weather wasn’t on our side for this trip. But it just shows you how much of an awesome place the Bugatti /Elusive area is, in most occasions around the world fishing would have been cancelled in these sorts of conditions whereas using the confines and shelter of the reef we managed to get out in the rain and have some of the best fishing around.

I think it’s safe to say if I was on the hunt for some insane GT fishing with the opportunity to catch a fish over 50kg I would be going to that Bugatti/Elusive area!! Well thats it for the last charter and I’m itching to get back out to the blue holes and hopefully if these couple days are anything to go by, watch out for some massive fish this year, im exicted!!!!

Cheers!

Glanville

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